Konstantin Dimopoulos – International artist who creates social art installations and public sculptures

Windgrass, Featherston New Zealand, by Konstantin Dimopoulos(photo sourced from Kons facebook page)

Windgrass, Featherston, New Zealand, by Konstantin Dimopoulos (photo sourced from Kons facebook page)

I was introduced to Konstantin Dimopoulos’ work by fellow Whitireia Journalism student Erin Kavanagh-Hall, who interviewed him about one of his newest kinetic sculptures. Below are excerpts from the article.

Konstantin Dimopoulos‘ striking and thought-provoking art works have been exhibited all over the world, but his latest work is inspired by his Kiwi upbringing.

The Wellingtonian, now based in Melbourne, launched his towering new sculpture, Windgrass, in Featherston’s Clifford Square recently.

The 8.5-metre tall brown and yellow creation pays homage to the grasses of the south Wairarapa coastline, a place the artist often visited as a young man.

”It represents the bulrushes of the Wairarapa area,” says Dimopoulos, an Egyptian-born Greek who was raised in Wellington.

Pacific Grass, Kinetic sculpture, Wellington- Konstantin Dimopoulos (Photo)

Pacific Grass, Kinetic sculpture, Wellington- Konstantin Dimopoulos (Photo)

The sculpture is designed to move with the wind – a recurring theme for Dimopoulos, whose first major sculpture, Pacific Grass, was made in response to Wellington’s famous wind.

He has since gone on to exhibit his art internationally, with public sculptures in collections around the United States and Australia, and to create art installations in response to social issues.

Most notable of these is The Blue Trees, which is appearing in many North American cities.

The Blue Trees, in which he colours trees with a biologically safe blue pigment, was designed to raise awareness of deforestation.

Blue Trees-Konstantin Dimopoulos (photo)

Blue Trees-Konstantin Dimopoulos (photo)

”Art can be an incredibly powerful tool. It helps us get the issue of deforestation on to the front cover of a magazine, not the back pages.”

He is now working on a project called Purple Rain, which comments on homelessness.

 

 

 

 

Below a video of the kenetic sculpture in Palmerston North – ‘Giants Among Us’. Watch it gently sway in the breeze.

Cinderazahd: For Your Eyes Only

Above is the name of an exhibition by Sophia Al-Maria, a Qatari writer and film-maker.

Men will be banned from watching a video display coming to the Lower Hutt art gallery that shows Muslim women without veils.

The Dowse Art Museum is preparing to host the world premiere of the art installation – despite advice from the Human Rights Commission that not letting men inside could be seen as sexual discrimination. (stuff.co.nz)

This exhibition has definitely got people talking and sharing their opinions on the issue, before it has even opened. And the feedback that I have read so far varies a lot.

Isn’t this is what art is meant to do? (at least one of its jobs anyway) To get us thinking, to help us see something from a different perspective than our own, and it can reveal what we feel and believe for ourselves in our own lives in relation to these types of issues, whether in New Zealand or somewhere else in the world.

Read the article here on stuff.