Narani Henson – Another persons trash is another ones treasure, voice, purpose.

Works by Narani Henson

‘My Plastic Beach’ by Narani Henson (picture)

Narani Henson uses marine plastic or plastic detritus, also known as ‘beach booty’ to draw attention to issues around waste and pollution.

She was born in New Zealand in 1976 where a love for the ocean was instilled in her at an early age. A keen surfer, avid collector and environmental artist she sees herself as a ‘custodian of the sea’. With the help of local marine conservation organisation Positive Change For Marine Life she collects marine plastic and turns it into evocative artworks. (Read more – sourced from here)

I found these thoughts from the artist at common ground, Byron Bay-Australia. You can read more from her here as well. I definitely recommend it!

“Do you know that 2.4 million pounds of plastic is estimated to enter the worlds ocean every hour? Which is 1089 tons of plastic!  When I first learnt of the huge volume of plastic pouring into the Worlds ocean’s I have to admit I became very emotional. Our global environment is facing significant risks from pollution which has been created through over-consumption and thoughtless waste disposal by us.

I am working on the process of recycling marine plastic by transforming it into ‘something else’. Through the presentation of my work I hope to highlight the amount of plastic in our ocean in an attempt to comment on the effects resulting from the by-products of our consumer society, I hope to draw people’s attention to the deeper meaning it conveys. I think like any global issue it can feel over whelming and too big to make a difference. But I made the conscience decision to do my part… think local act global, every little bit counts, just like organisations like “Positive change for marine life”, “My Two hands” and “Take three”, I started to take responsibility for my beach by picking up marine plastic and rubbish”. – Narani Henson

Konstantin Dimopoulos – International artist who creates social art installations and public sculptures

Windgrass, Featherston New Zealand, by Konstantin Dimopoulos(photo sourced from Kons facebook page)

Windgrass, Featherston, New Zealand, by Konstantin Dimopoulos (photo sourced from Kons facebook page)

I was introduced to Konstantin Dimopoulos’ work by fellow Whitireia Journalism student Erin Kavanagh-Hall, who interviewed him about one of his newest kinetic sculptures. Below are excerpts from the article.

Konstantin Dimopoulos‘ striking and thought-provoking art works have been exhibited all over the world, but his latest work is inspired by his Kiwi upbringing.

The Wellingtonian, now based in Melbourne, launched his towering new sculpture, Windgrass, in Featherston’s Clifford Square recently.

The 8.5-metre tall brown and yellow creation pays homage to the grasses of the south Wairarapa coastline, a place the artist often visited as a young man.

”It represents the bulrushes of the Wairarapa area,” says Dimopoulos, an Egyptian-born Greek who was raised in Wellington.

Pacific Grass, Kinetic sculpture, Wellington- Konstantin Dimopoulos (Photo)

Pacific Grass, Kinetic sculpture, Wellington- Konstantin Dimopoulos (Photo)

The sculpture is designed to move with the wind – a recurring theme for Dimopoulos, whose first major sculpture, Pacific Grass, was made in response to Wellington’s famous wind.

He has since gone on to exhibit his art internationally, with public sculptures in collections around the United States and Australia, and to create art installations in response to social issues.

Most notable of these is The Blue Trees, which is appearing in many North American cities.

The Blue Trees, in which he colours trees with a biologically safe blue pigment, was designed to raise awareness of deforestation.

Blue Trees-Konstantin Dimopoulos (photo)

Blue Trees-Konstantin Dimopoulos (photo)

”Art can be an incredibly powerful tool. It helps us get the issue of deforestation on to the front cover of a magazine, not the back pages.”

He is now working on a project called Purple Rain, which comments on homelessness.

 

 

 

 

Below a video of the kenetic sculpture in Palmerston North – ‘Giants Among Us’. Watch it gently sway in the breeze.