Konstantin Dimopoulos – International artist who creates social art installations and public sculptures

Windgrass, Featherston New Zealand, by Konstantin Dimopoulos(photo sourced from Kons facebook page)

Windgrass, Featherston, New Zealand, by Konstantin Dimopoulos (photo sourced from Kons facebook page)

I was introduced to Konstantin Dimopoulos’ work by fellow Whitireia Journalism student Erin Kavanagh-Hall, who interviewed him about one of his newest kinetic sculptures. Below are excerpts from the article.

Konstantin Dimopoulos‘ striking and thought-provoking art works have been exhibited all over the world, but his latest work is inspired by his Kiwi upbringing.

The Wellingtonian, now based in Melbourne, launched his towering new sculpture, Windgrass, in Featherston’s Clifford Square recently.

The 8.5-metre tall brown and yellow creation pays homage to the grasses of the south Wairarapa coastline, a place the artist often visited as a young man.

”It represents the bulrushes of the Wairarapa area,” says Dimopoulos, an Egyptian-born Greek who was raised in Wellington.

Pacific Grass, Kinetic sculpture, Wellington- Konstantin Dimopoulos (Photo)

Pacific Grass, Kinetic sculpture, Wellington- Konstantin Dimopoulos (Photo)

The sculpture is designed to move with the wind – a recurring theme for Dimopoulos, whose first major sculpture, Pacific Grass, was made in response to Wellington’s famous wind.

He has since gone on to exhibit his art internationally, with public sculptures in collections around the United States and Australia, and to create art installations in response to social issues.

Most notable of these is The Blue Trees, which is appearing in many North American cities.

The Blue Trees, in which he colours trees with a biologically safe blue pigment, was designed to raise awareness of deforestation.

Blue Trees-Konstantin Dimopoulos (photo)

Blue Trees-Konstantin Dimopoulos (photo)

”Art can be an incredibly powerful tool. It helps us get the issue of deforestation on to the front cover of a magazine, not the back pages.”

He is now working on a project called Purple Rain, which comments on homelessness.

 

 

 

 

Below a video of the kenetic sculpture in Palmerston North – ‘Giants Among Us’. Watch it gently sway in the breeze.

Bill Hammond

Bill Hammond is one of my personal favourite New Zealand artists.

And continuing to a simliar thread as the last post, some of Hammonds work also comments on human interaction with the birds & environment of this land.

One of the common themes in his paintings are the half animal/human creatures with avian heads and human limbs. They have quite an Egyptian look to them.

One website biography on Hammond said this:

‘Hammond’s work tackles social and environmental issues, conveying messages about humanity and its status as an endangered species.’ (source: Biography)

Endangerment: he looked back into New Zealand’s environmental history for his subject matter, drawing inspiration from the studies of Sir Walter Buller. The Buller paintings show us some of the ways in which birds have been forced to relate to us.

Birdlife: These works came about after Hammond returned from a trip to the remote Auckland Islands, where there are no people and birds still rule. (source: wikipedia)

(Photo: drift.net.nz )

Current issues addressed in sculpture trail

1344 Red Kiwis- By Donna Sarten (photo sourced from The Epoch Times)

 

Sculptural works at Te Atatu Peninsula by some of New Zealand’s top artists illustrate current environmental, political and social issues that relate specifically to New Zealand. They reflect the ecology of the area and confront issues such as child abuse and the near extinction of native animals and birds (to name a few.)

Read more about the sculpture trail here

View the official website and see more pictures here