The Cut Collective

Cut Collective consists of five like-minded people, all from different backgrounds in art. They are based in Auckland, New Zealand.

The Street art – Oi YOU! Website describes them like this:

The members all produce very distinctive imagery, which incorporates elements from popular culture, graphic design, local history and contemporary political issues.

Cut Collective’s practice ranges from commissioned artworks to gallery exhibitions, public murals, commercial design and illustration and apparel.

Picture perfect in a world of chaos- Public access 5, by the Cut Collective. (photos from Cut Collectives facebook page)

Picture perfect in a world of chaos- Public access 5, by the Cut Collective. (photos from Cut Collectives facebook page)

One of their exhibitions that really caught my eye was Public Access 5 – Picture perfect in a world of chaos. It happened a few years ago now. But the content is still relevant to things that are going on around the world now. Some peoples fairytale stories (or how they’re portrayed to us in the media anyway) couldn’t be further from the reality of the hardship of others in the world.

On one side of the artwork is a scene that you’d imagine in a fairytale, Full of bright colour, with Prince William, his bride Kate Middleton, Bambi & the a few of the 7 dwarfs. On the other side, the complete opposite – a dark war scene. Some of the 7 dwarfs are a lot worse off in this scenario.

It also made me think about how one picture shows only a second, even less, in time. There is so much more beyond the ‘picture perfect.’ And do we choose to stay in our fantasy worlds, or push further through to where we can be part of the change?

Picture perfect in a world of chaos, Public Access 5, the Cut Collective (photo from cut collective facebook page)

Picture perfect in a world of chaos, Public Access 5, the Cut Collective (photo from cut collective facebook page)

On the Cut Collective website it says this about the artwork:

Working around the central theme of “Picture Perfect in a World of Chaos”, this show deals with the representation of a world that is a palpable fantasy, and looks to explore the ridiculous nature of the variant realities we receive through multiple media channels. Something we here at CC have come to call “The Gap”

Read more about this exhibition and check out more pics here.

Picture perfect in a world of chaos, Public access 5, by the Cut Collective (photo from cut collective facebook page)

Picture perfect in a world of chaos, Public access 5, by the Cut Collective (photo from cut collective facebook page)

Mural showing Dunedin’s colourful history

Wall Mural by Dan Mills, of Mangawhai, and Phillipa Crofskey, of Dunedin

Wall Mural by Dan Mills, of Mangawhai, and Phillipa Crofskey, of Dunedin.
(Photo source from here)

This piece is something I found while surfing the net. While it may not be entirely considered as ‘political art’… I think it is very timely. It got me thinking anyway! Which is what all good visual art should do.

We are a multi-cultural nation. This mural is touching on the diversity we have in New Zealand as a country.

In October 2012, Hoyts Lane off the Octagon was transformed with a new mural paint job.

Dunedin’s colourful history was woven into a tapestry which was unveiled during the Otago Festival of the Arts.

Artist Dan Mills, of Mangawhai, said the mural was a blend of Maori, Scottish, Chinese and Lebanese culture.

“I wanted it to represent Dunedin’s history and the fabric of its society,” he said.

“So, it entwines Scottish tartan, Chinese fabric, Lebanese embroidery and woven flax. There are a lot of metaphors in the work. The gold in the fish scales represents the gold taken from the ground of Otago, while the taniwha is also a Chinese dragon.”

“Everything flows towards the Octagon, through a flax fishing net.”

Parts of above article are from Otago Daily Times online. Read full story here.

Political posters by New Zealand street artist ‘Toothfish’

Toothfish-warAnti-capitalist posters by a New Zealand street artist have popped up in 35 countries around the world.

He goes by the name Toothfish and says like the endangered species he’d prefer to remain inconspicuous to save himself from mankind.

“Art itself is either undervalued or overvalued,” he says. “The value systems on this planet seem skewed and wrong and Toothfish is using art to attack some of these value systems.”

Toothfish is an eco-artist and international poster project who raises awareness of environmental/political issues by producing posters which are distributed internationally in both the real and virtual worlds.

Read more & see a video interview with Toothfish here. Above picture by Toothfish & sourced from here.