Chris Booth- Sculptor

Rainbow Warrior Memorial, by Chris Booth, Photo from here.

Rainbow Warrior Memorial, 1988-1990, by Chris Booth.
The Rainbow Warrior propellor is in the centre of the sculpture, surrounded by an arch of large basalt boulders recovered from a local beach.
Photo from here.

I keep finding new and inspiring artists, and Chris Booth is no exception. Have a read on his website and a look at his sculptures, and you will soon see it for yourself! The text below was taken from part of what he has written on his website.

“Chris Booth’s empathy for people, his ability to relate to their culture, and his underlying respect for the environment have enabled him to create memorable works that sit respectfully in the landscape’.
‘…… which wait patiently, quietly expecting due reverence from the observer’.

Ken Scarlett OAM, World Sculpture News, 2000.

Chris Booth gives a bit of an explaination to what is behind some of his work:

Once a site is identified and approved for a specific land art work I look closely at, for example, the origins of the land, itʼs flora and fauna, the spirit of the land, the social history and land use from ancient times to the present day. Also, my materials are researched and sourced locally. To me this is holism. By way of explaining this further, sometimes in the past I chose to ʻpoint fingersʼ in my work such as showing my opposition to the testing of nuclear devices in the Pacific Ocean, the destruction of indigenous forests in Northland, NZ or the exposing of injustices such as racism. At first these works had the desired effect of alerting others to the problem or adding to the voice of objectors. But, as I became more known, my work became more ʻcollectableʼ and, instead of achieving my original objective, these works became collectable commodities with a monetary value for investment! In 1986 I made a major shift back to holism (my first explorations into holism were carried out in the early 70ʼs using scale models and drawings). Gateway 1986-1990 and the Rainbow Warrior Memorial 1988-1990 were the first major public art works of mine to use this holistic approach. – Chris Booth (All sourced from www.chrisbooth.co.nz)

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